A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

The centennial Victoria St tour — a glimpse of Melbourne

Victoria St, Melbourne’s east-west main street, is named for its colonial color. Victoria St has a history of more than 100 years, making it an ancient neighborhood in Australia’s short history. It was also the name of the street that attracted me and told me that there should be a lot of buildings here that were antique, and it was this attraction that prompted me to wander and walk along the street many times. There was, of course, no sound of horse-drawn carriages crushing the stony road, but more of the modern steel thump of cars and trolleys.

Victoria St, best known for its familiar Queen Victoria Market, is the most intact 19th-century Market in the southern hemisphere and remains largely intact to this day as one of Melbourne’s heritage buildings.

Stroll in Victoria street (Victoria St), if you looked up to watch, the buildings here will also find some interesting logo, 570 Victoria street Victoria locomotive association headquarters have office here in the past, when you look up at the roof, will see a model train placed above, here is also the protection of the building in Melbourne. Signs from the past can still be seen dimly on the walls of many of Victoria St’s old buildings and shops, some of which have been peeled off with layers of century-old signs that show how the storefront has come close to being owned by its owners. At 442 Victoria St, the Victorian building is quintessentially British, with cast-iron railings and balconies that suggest luxury and should have been a mansion.

There is a church in Victoria St, which is said to be the largest parish church in Australia. This church is called St Mary Star church. Due to historical reasons, the century-old church was completely restored until 2002. Across from the Queen Victoria Market is the royal Melbourne regiment’s 6th battalion hall, also a Melbourne conservation building. Further east will see a baroque buildings, the wall of the red and white lines on the drawing, no wonder people say that this building is in the blood and bandages, but for us Chinese tourists, the building English literal translation is the PUBLIC bathroom (PUBLIC BATHS), so have fun here in Melbourne “big bath”, here is a fitness center in Melbourne, there is a swimming pool and gym.

In Melbourne Victoria St with the corner of Russell St crossroads, stands a monument “” eight hours, granite on the base of the monument engraved with inscriptions:” Victoria was launched in 1856 eight hours movement, was established in 1903 “, conical monument of stone body at the top of the badge with circular golden ball, “labor, entertainment, Rest Rest, Labour & amp; “Recreation”, and the number “888” symbolizing “8 hours of work, 8 hours of entertainment, 8 hours of rest”.

When you walk down Victoria St to Cariton Gardens, you will find the royal society of Victoria, a classical Victorian building designed by Australian architect Joseph reed in 1859. Continue east along Victoria St and you’ll find the old Melbourne fire museum, also a century-old building, followed by the old industrial buildings of the Melbourne distillery. There are several century-old hotel buildings on Victoria St that, on closer inspection, should have been converted into apartments.

& have spent

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

A trip to VictoriaSt over the past 100 years

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