Tag Archives: Sex Relations

Life Inventory for iPad Named Top iOS App No. 3 for 2012

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory for iPad app has been named Top iOS app No. 3for 2012. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist. Version 2.1 provides substantially faster access when moving between editing and reviewing individual incidents in addition to allowing for easy corrections of Entity and Incident names while reviewing Incidents. Version 2.5, which provides even more functionality and an enhanced graphical UI, should be available in the iTunes App store shortly.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad 2.1 is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. Review copies are available on request.

Life Inventory for iPad Version 2.5 Provides Enhanced User Experience

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory for iPad app which was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012 has been updated to version 2.5 providing an enhanced user experience. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist. Version 2.1 provides substantially faster access when moving between editing and reviewing individual incidents in addition to allowing for easy corrections of Entity and Incident names while reviewing Incidents. New in version 2.5 are enhanced graphics including switches for responding to Yes/No questions marked “Yes” and “No” instead of “On” and “Off”; quicker navigation from Determine Effects to Review Incidents; and multi-page printing now includes headers and footers.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad 2.5 is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. Review copies are available on request.

No 3 Top iOS App – Life Inventory for iPad Ver. 2.5 Adds New Features

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory for iPad app which was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012 has been updated to version 2.5 providing an new features and updated look and feel. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

Version 2.1 provides substantially faster access when moving between editing and reviewing individual incidents in addition to allowing for easy corrections of Entity and Incident names while reviewing Incidents. New in version 2.5 are enhanced graphics including switches for responding to Yes/No questions marked “Yes” and “No” instead of “On” and “Off”; quicker navigation from Determine Effects to Review Incidents; and multi-page printing now includes headers and footers. Even more features to help speed data entry are coming in the next update.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad 2.5 is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.

Life Inventory for iPad (3rd Top iOS App for 2012) Version 2.6 Available

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory for iPad app which was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012 has been updated to version 2.6 providing faster entry of data, especially for New Fears. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

Version 2.1 provides substantially faster access when moving between editing and reviewing individual incidents in addition to allowing for easy corrections of Entity and Incident names while reviewing Incidents. Version 2.5 provided enhanced graphics including switches for responding to Yes/No questions marked “Yes” and “No” instead of “On” and “Off”; quicker navigation from Determine Effects to Review Incidents; and multi-page printing now includes headers and footers.

New in Version 2.6 the Popover for Adding a New Fear now includes list of all incidents to assist in researching available data, and when new fear is being entered potential matches are displayed. This provides about a five-fold increase for the entry of Fears. For the iPhone and iPod touch version, support for the new iPhone 5 screen size has been submitted for update to the iTunes App Store.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad 2.6 is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.

12-Steppers: Is There A Moral Inventory App? Yes! Life Inventory for iOS

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory iPhone and iPad apps provide an organized way to create a Moral Inventory, a requirement of Step 4 in 12-Step programs like AA and other addiction recovery programs. Following the detailed instructions, the user is gently guided through the complex requirements needed in order to complete a thorough Moral Inventory. These Lifestyle apps can also be used by non-12-steppers who want to learn more about themselves than they ever thought possible. The Life Inventory for iPad app was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

The process of completing a Life (Moral) Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

The Life Inventory apps guide the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to be completely honest about themselves. The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad or Life Inventory (for iPhone or iPod touch) is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of each app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. Review copies are available on request.

Addiction Recovery (ARP) – Moral Inventory App for iOS – Life Inventory

Indie LDS developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory iPhone and iPad apps provide an organized way to create a Moral Inventory, a requirement of step 4 in the Addiction Recovery Program (ARP). Following the detailed instructions, the user is gently guided through the complex requirements needed in order to complete a thorough Moral Inventory. These Lifestyle apps can also be used by any 12- or non-12-steppers who want to learn more about themselves than they ever thought possible. The Life Inventory for iPad app was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

The process of completing a Life (Moral) Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

The Life Inventory apps guide the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to be completely honest about themselves. The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad or Life Inventory (for iPhone or iPod touch) is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of each app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. Review copies are available on request.

Life Inventory – iOS Apps that Can Change the Quality of Life

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory apps can help change the quality of life. The iPad version (named #3 top iOS App) and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Life Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of personality, strengths and weaknesses leading to a better quality of life. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

James Hollender is also the author of a suite of Nutrient apps based on the USDA National Nutrient Database:
– iCarbs (Carbohydrates)
– iCholesterol (Dietary Cholesterol)
– iFiber
– iKals (Calories)
– iProteins
– iSatFat (Saturated Fat)
– iSodium (Vitamins K1, K1D & K2)
– iSugars
– Vitamin K

Life Inventory and Life Inventory for iPad 2.6 are $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.

#3 Top iOS App for 2012 Life Inventory for iPad New Version 2.7

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory for iPad app which was named Top iOS app No. 3 for 2012 has been updated to version 2.7 providing additional enhancements. This and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Moral Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of their personality, strengths, and weaknesses. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

Life Inventory for iPad 2.7 is $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.

Life Inventory New Version 2.8 Adds Even More Speed Functionality

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory apps can help change the quality of life. The iPad version (named #3 top iOS App) and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Life Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of personality, strengths and weaknesses leading to a better quality of life. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

Version 2.8 provides additional speed enhancements:
– Added “Save & Jump to Review” button to “Answer Fear Questions” and “Answer Sex Relations Questions” activities
– Added “Edit” button to “Review Fear Answers” and “Review Sex Relations Answers” activities
– Forms being edited are saved when app is locked
– Popovers now get cancelled when app is suspended if password is set

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.

The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:
– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:
– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:
– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears.

The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:
– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:
– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:
– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

James Hollender is also the author of a suite of Nutrient apps based on the USDA National Nutrient Database:
– iCarbs (Carbohydrates)
– iCholesterol (Dietary Cholesterol)
– iFiber
– iKals (Calories)
– iProteins
– iSatFat (Saturated Fat)
– iSodium (Vitamins K1, K1D & K2)
– iSugars
– Vitamin K

Life Inventory 2.4 and Life Inventory for iPad 2.8 are $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.

Developer of Life Inventory Apps Reveals Apple Secret About Hard Reset

Indie developer James Hollender, creator of the Life Inventory apps reveals one of Apple’s best kept secrets, which also happens to be something members of their Genius Bar frequently recommend to visitors, i.e., the “Hard Reset”, which will fix many problems you might be experiencing on any iOS device. Sometime when users report problems with an app, he tells them what Apple recommended and further it should be done weekly. Users find it perplexing the procedure isn’t more advertised.

So what’s the secret? Indie developer James Hollender, creator of the Life Inventory apps reveals one of Apple’s best kept secrets, which also happens to be something members of their Genius Bar frequently recommend to visitors, i.e., the “Hard Reset”, which will fix many problems you might be experiencing on any iOS device. Sometime when users report problems with an app, he tells them what Apple recommended and further it should be done weekly. Users find it perplexing the procedure isn’t more advertised.

The “Hard Reset” procedure is fairly easy to accomplish, and in many instances you will discover your iOS device is functioning much faster than it previously was. Here we go:

1. Open up the Springboard by double tapping the Home button.
2. Press and hold any icon in the Springboard until they are all wiggling and have a red circled minus in the upper left corner.
3. Press the circled red minus for each icon in the Springboard … (basically this exits each app that is running … most won’t be running since the Springboard contains a list of last accessed apps and Apple doesn’t distinguish which ones are will running or have been killed off.
4. Once the Springboard is cleared of all icons, tap above the Springoard to close it.
5. Press and hold both Home and Power buttons until the screen goes blank or you are asked to swipe to power off the device (this depends on the version of iOS you are running).
6. Wait until the screen goes blank for at least 10-15 seconds
7. Power the iOS device back on.

All developers would like to think their programs are perfect and don’t have any memory issues, but the fact is frequently there are situations which occur that were never anticipated, which might cause a memory leak. Once the Hard Reset is done, you are starting fresh and should experience better device performance.

And now a little information about one of the developer’s best secrets, his Life Inventory apps:

Indie developer James Hollender’s Life Inventory apps can help change the quality of life. The iPad version (named #3 top iOS App) and the iPhone version are Lifestyle apps that guide users in creating their own Life Inventory, which can provide greater self-understanding of personality, strengths and weaknesses leading to a better quality of life. These apps allow the user to learn more about themselves than ever thought possible and at only a small fraction the cost of a single visit to a therapist.

The process of completing a Life Inventory does not directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life. The Life Inventory app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened. The questions asked help the user delve into areas often never considered before, like:

– What did I want?
– Why did I want it?
– What am I not admitting?
– What lie did I tell myself?
– What did I leave out or not say?
– What lie did I tell others?
– Have I ever done the same thing?
– Was it any of my business?
– Were my expectations reasonable?
– What was the real truth?
– What was I not seeing?
– Did I fail to see the facts of the situation?
– What actions did I take to get what I wanted?
– What actions did I omit to get what I wanted?

Life Inventory for iPad guides the user through six different steps, each with its own activity grouping, for making a Life Inventory in writing:

– Build Lists
– Causes and Effects
– My Part
– Fears Analysis
– Fear Questions
– Sex Relations

Throughout the process, users are encouraged to write out their Inventory, be completely honest about themselves and take advantage of encouragement and support.

The Inventory begins by making one simple list, which defines four fixed Categories in which to file away what are broadly categorized as Incidents:

– People
– Institutions and Organizations
– Principles, Ideals and Beliefs
– Sources of Anxiety and Excitement

Each of the four Categories will contain hierarchical sub-categories. From there, users outline Entities and then individual Incidents.

Step-by-step, users complete the Causes and Effects of each Incident. Next, users determine the part they played in each Incident listed. It is not unusual to create hundreds of Incident forms, each devoted to a single incident. The app includes the ability to create and save all written lists and forms with password protection. Having completed all their Incident forms, users can refer to these forms to help list all their Fears. The app includes the following eight pre-defined fears, to which the user is free to add:

– Other people’s opinions
– Not getting what I want
– Not having control of the situation
– Financial insecurity
– Abandonment
– Physical harm
– Failure
– Success

The fifth step is examining each Fear category and answering the following key questions:

– Why did I have this fear?
– When did I first notice this fear in my life?
– How did I hold on to this fear?
– What did this fear make me do?
– What chain of circumstances did this fear set in motion in my life?
– How did I react to this fear?
– What decision did this fear cause me to make?
– How did self-reliance fail me?
– What should I have done instead?

And the sixth and final step is examining Sex Relations, where users answer all the following questions regarding each of their sexual relationships:

– How was I selfish?
– Where was I dishonest?
– Where was I inconsiderate?
– Who was hurt in this situation?
– Did I arouse jealousy, suspicion, or bitterness?
– Where was I at fault?
– What should I have done instead?
– What will I do in the future?
– Did I pray or have spiritual conversations with him/her?
– Did I pray for him/her?
– Did I enjoy his/her company?
– Did we bring each other closer to God?

“The process of completing a Life Inventory doesn’t directly address anyone’s specific problems or addictions, but rather helps the user examine in detail events that have transpired in their life,” stated indie developer James Hollender. “The Life Inventory for iPad app gently assists the user in probing into not only what happened, but also why it happened.”

James Hollender is also the author of a suite of Nutrient apps based on the USDA National Nutrient Database:
– iCarbs (Carbohydrates)
– iCholesterol (Dietary Cholesterol)
– iFiber
– iKals (Calories)
– iProteins
– iSatFat (Saturated Fat)
– iSodium (Vitamins K1, K1D & K2)
– iSugars
– Vitamin K

Life Inventory and Life Inventory for iPad 2.6 are $9.99 (USD) and available worldwide exclusively through the App Store in the Lifestyle category. A Lite version of the app is $1.99, a supplement that provides a mock Moral Inventory from which the user can learn by example and experimentation. A similar version is also available for the iPhone and iPod touch. Review copies are available on request.